CAIR Disavows Tampa Terror Suspect; Was There Entrapment?


The Florida Council of American-Islamic Relations on Monday disavowed any connection to a Pinellas Park man arrested on charges of plotting a terrorist attack in Tampa.

Federal agents said Sami Osmakac, 25, had a list of targets, including nightclubs in the Ybor City area, the Operations Center of the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office in Ybor City and a business in the South Tampa area.

Osmakac, a naturalized citizen born in Kosovo, was arraigned Monday on charges of attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction and faces a possible $250,000 fine and a maximum of life in prison.

Hassan Shibly, director of CAIR's Florida chapter, said Osmakac had been banned from several mosques and "was no friend or supporter of the Muslim community."

Shibly characterized Osmakac as a "self-radicalized lone wolf" and said the local community played "a vital role" in bringing him to the attention of the FBI and the U.S. attorney's office.

Nonetheless, Shibly expressed "concern about a perception of entrapment" and said CAIR will monitor the case.

"The weapons and explosives were provided by the government. Was he just a troubled individual, or did he pose a real threat?" said Shibly, who was briefed by FBI agents prior to Osmakac's arraignment.

Osmakac planned to build a car bomb and wanted to use the explosive belt to "get in somewhere where there's a lot of people" and take hostages, according to authorities. He allegedly stated that he would then make demands of the FBI to release some prisoners and then, "They can take me in five million pieces."


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5:09PM JAN 9TH 2012
3/3/11 - (CNN) -- A 21-year-old man from Kosovo is in custody after two U.S. airmen were killed and two others were wounded Wednesday in a shooting incident on a U.S. military bus at Germany's Frankfurt Airport, authorities said.
The suspect is named Arid Uka, from the northern town of Mitrovica, Kosovo's interior minister, Bajram Rexhepi, told CNN, citing the U.S. Embassy in Pristina as his source.
Uka approached the bus, which was parked outside Terminal 2 and was clearly marked as a U.S. military vehicle, German police said. He first engaged U.S. military members in a conversation, then pulled out a handgun and began firing -- first outside the bus and then inside the bus, police said.
1/9/12 – Huffington Post -- ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- A 25-year-old man from the former Yugoslavia was charged with plotting a radical Islamic attack on crowded locations around Tampa, including nightclubs and a sheriff's office, with a car bomb, assault rifle and other explosives, federal authorities said Monday.
The U.S. Department of Justice said Sami Osmakac, a naturalized American citizen born in Kosovo, recorded an eight minute video shortly before his arrest explaining why he wanted to bring terror to his "victims' hearts" in the Tampa Bay area.
6/17/10 – Department of Justice (FBI) Bajram Asllani, 29, a resident of Mitrovica, Kosovo, has been charged in a criminal complaint with providing material support to terrorists and conspiring to murder, kidnap, maim, and injure persons abroad, David Kris, Assistant Attorney General for National Security; George E.B. Holding, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of North Carolina; Owen D. Harris, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Charlotte Field Division; and Robin Pendergraft, Director of the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, announced today.
Asllani, also known as “Bajram Aslani,” or “Ebu Hatab,” was arrested earlier today by authorities in Kosovo in connection with a U.S. provisional arrest warrant issued in the Eastern District of North Carolina. The United States intends to seek his extradition from Kosovo to stand trial in Raleigh. In accordance with the extradition agreement between the United States and Kosovo, Asllani faces a potential maximum of 40 years in prison if convicted.
Last July, eight defendants were indicted in the Eastern District of North of Carolina on charges of conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists; conspiracy to murder, kidnap, maim and injure persons abroad; and other violations. Those charged were Daniel Patrick Boyd, a U.S. citizen and resident of North Carolina; Hysen Sherifi, a native of Kosovo and a U.S. legal permanent resident in North Carolina; Anes Subasic, a naturalized U.S. citizen and resident of North Carolina; Zakariya Boyd, a U.S. citizen and resident of North Carolina; Dylan Boyd, a U.S. citizen and resident of North Carolina; Jude Kenan Mohammad, a U.S. citizen; Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, a U.S. citizen and resident of North Carolina; and Ziyad Yaghi, a U.S. citizen and resident of North Carolina.
5/8/07 – Chronicles The story: four Albanian Muslims from Kosovo, plus a Turk and a Jordanian, are arrested for conspiring to attack Fort Dix, a military base in New Jersey, with AK47s and “to kill as many soldiers as possible” (U.S. Attorney’s Office).
The Mainstream Media spin: “Four of them were born in the former Yugoslavia” (The New York Times); “One of the suspects was born in Jordan, another in Turkey… [t]he rest are believed to be from the former Yugoslavia” (CNN); “Four of the men were born in the former Yugoslavia, one in Jordan and one in Turkey” (MSNBC); “One of the suspects was born in Turkey and four in the former Yugoslavia” (AP), und so weiter…
The names of the four “Yugoslavs” are Dritan Duka, Eljvir Duka, Shain Duka (three brothers, all of them in the United States illegally), and Agron Abdullahu. Those are Albanian names, of course, but not one in a hundred Americans knows that. In fact, grasping that they are Albanians and knowing that “ethnic Albanian” plus “Muslim from the former Yugoslavia” equals “Kosovo,” is the privilege of experts. It is but one of many Balkan equations that mainstream media editors are determined to keep hidden from their consumers. That there is nothing in the federal complaint about the “Yugoslav” suspects’ origins is almost certainly the result of political interference.
White House spokesman Tony Snow was quick to assure us there is “no direct evidence” that the men arrested in the Fort Dix plot have ties to international terrorism. His meta-message is clear: The Administration knows it cannot keep the Albanian identity of four “Yugoslav” suspects concealed for ever, but it wants to pre-empt any suspicion that an independent KosovA would be a black hole of jihad-terrorism in the heart of Europe. Hastily denying the group’s link to al-Qaeda and other global networks is a political necessity for the proponents of Kosovo’s independence, not necessarily the reality.

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