Politics

Backing Rick Scott, NFIB Unveils 2014 Legislative Agenda

By: Kevin Derby | Posted: March 11, 2014 3:55 AM
Bill Herrle

Bill Herrle

The Florida chapter of the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) launched Small Business Days on Monday as it pushes its agenda in the Legislature and rallies behind Gov. Rick Scott who is facing a tough re-election battle in November.

The NFIB’s program for Small Business Days included a reception at the governor’s mansion with Scott on Monday night and the group left no room for doubt that they backed the Republican for a second term. Bill Herrle, the executive director of the Florida chapter of the NFIB, praised Scott on Monday, saying the governor was good for small businesses. Herrle also expressed support for Scott’s call to cut business retail taxes by $100 million, which is one of the governor’s chief goals for the current legislative session.

"From cutting corporate income tax so four out of five businesses no longer pay it, to reducing annual business filing fees, to pushing for a decrease in the sales tax businesses pay on commercial leases, Gov. Scott has shown he is committed to doing everything he can to help businesses grow and succeed in Florida,”” Herrle said. ““We are confident Florida's business-friendly climate will continue to strengthen throughout this year and look forward to seeing more businesses move their operations to the Sunshine State."

With the 2014 legislative session starting last week, the NFIB unveiled its agenda on Monday. Besides backing Scott’s call for cutting the business rent tax, NFIB is supporting the governor’s proposal to roll back $400 million in vehicle registration fees. The NFIB is also behind Sen. Dorothy Hukill’s, R-Port Orange, bill to cut $240 million from the Communications Services Tax (CST). The NFIB is also backing House Speaker Will Weatherford’s, R-Wesley Chapel, and Sen. Wilton Simpson’s, R-Brooksville, proposal to reform public employee pensions and legal reforms. On other state matters, the NFIB stands against increasing the state minimum wage and increasing the penalties imposed on workplaces that are found guulty of discrimination.

On federal matters, the NFIB continues to support a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution and opposes President Barack Obama’s proposal to raise the federal minimum wage. The NFIB also continues to oppose expanding Medicaid.

Besides the reception with Scott, the NFIB program features Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera, state CFO Jeff Atwater, Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Fort Walton Beach, Weatherford and Rep, Mike Hill, R-Pensacola. Media figure Tucker Carlson is scheduled to meet with some members of the NFIB on Tuesday night.

Herrle insisted Small Business Days offered a chance for legislators and business owners to meet and touch on the concerns of the small-business community.

“This event is one-of-a-kind and a tremendous opportunity for the small-business owners of Florida to network with fellow business owners and to meet and speak directly with those political leaders who represent them," Herrle said. ““We are grateful to the small-business owners who take the time to come to Tallahassee, and equally appreciative of the lawmakers who join us to discuss the legislative issues most important to the small-business community.”



Reach Kevin Derby at kderby@sunshinestatenews.com.


Comments (2)

Some Documented Facts
8:10AM MAR 12TH 2014
As Jeb Bush moves up to the top spot in his family dynasty it’s easy to see how he and his cronies move people around like they are playing a game of chess. Moving son George P. Bush in to the Texas Land Commissioner while son “Jeb, Jr.” runs the Florida Maverick PAC.
Check out Richard (Rick) Lyn Scott's (uses Richard L. Scott) corporate histories. Just like the Bush family he was once in the state of CT. 1999 Corporate filing for his Delaware Corporation “America’s Healthcare Network” carried a address of – Stanford, Ct.; other entries are Annapolis, MD probably when he was in the Navy.

After graduating, Scott practiced law at Johnson & Swanson in Dallas, Texas, where he was eventually made partner. In 1988, Scott and multimillionaire Richard Rainwater founded their own company, Columbia Hospital Corporation, through which they bought old hospitals, including many in South Florida. The venture was so successful that Business Week named it one of the best performing companies in the nation. A 1997 fraud investigation forced Scott out as CEO and Chairman. From then on until his venture into politics, Scott dabbled in several profitable investment schemes, and was even co-owner of the Texas Rangers baseball team with President George W. Bush.
GOOGLE “The Sources of George W. Bush's $41 Million Texas War Chest” and you will find a lot of familiar names. The Bush Profiteers: 100 Donors Who Enjoy Hands-off, Handout Government. {The Bush family scheme also called “pay to play!”

In identifying the economic and ideological interests of Bush’s donors, researchers kept coming across large contributors who became known as the Bush Profiteers. Many of these Bush Profiteers are:
- Corporate welfare kings who derived a portion of their personal wealth from the taxpayers; or
- Donors who appear to have an interest in taking the regulatory cops off the beat.
In fact, many large Bush donors straddle both camps, seeming to want the government off their backs except when it is giving them taxpayer’s money. The ranks of the Bush Profiteers include corporate welfare kings, snake oil salesmen, money launderers, tax evaders, tort dodgers, tobacco hacks and toxic waste dumpers.

The following Bush Profiteer profiles cite the total amount of money that the Profiteers contributed to Bush’s two gubernatorial campaigns (some totals include the contributions of nuclear family members).

Number 65 on that list is Richard L. Scott (Ft. Worth): $10,000
with start up capital from Richard Rainwater (No. 10), Scott started Columbia/HCA Healthcare chain. The HMO’s 10-year, hospital-buying binge ended in 1997 with federal investigators raiding Columbia facilities for evidence of Medicare fraud.

# 63. José Fanjul (Palm Beach, FL): $10,000 [Sweet Sugar Deals!]
The First Family of Corporate Welfare, the Fanjuls control a third of Florida sugar production, collecting $60 million a year in federal subsidies. Their Everglades land was drained at public expense, an environmental nightmare that costs taxpayers $63 million a year to maintain. The Fanjuls invest heavily in politicians of all parties.

# 80. George/Richard Wackenhut (FL): $6,000
The largest U.S. prison company, Wackenhut Corrections (2003) – WCC officially changes name to The GEO Group, Inc. .had tens of millions of dollars in contracts with Texas. The state had to take over a Wackenhut-run facility in Austin in 1999 following criminal charges that Wackenhut understaffed the jail, falsified its records and employed guards that beat and had sex with inmates.

NOTE: Former University of Florida Prof. Charles Thomas conducted “a supposedly impartial research on the private prison industry” until it was learned that he owned private prison stock, had been paid $3 million for consulting for a private prison firm and served on the board of Prison Realty Trust (Now Corrections Corporation of America). Thomas was fined $20,000 by the Florida Commission on Ethics and stepped down from his university position.

NOTE: Florida is embarking upon the largest prison privatization plan in history. As part of a last-minute budget amendment, the state legislature mandated the privatization of the correctional services of 18 counties in south Florida, for a total of nearly 30 correctional facilities.

No state has ever undertaken such an ambitious expansion of their private prison system, and for good reason; private prisons consistently fail to live up to contractual obligations, don’t save money, and provide less efficient services than government-run prisons.

But that hasn’t stopped Florida from forging ahead, even despite the fact that the Senate’s Budget Chief at one point even called this initiative an experiment to see if the state could save money by privatization. While that’s not a gamble most sane politicians would ever want to make, JD Alexander was probably swayed, as were many other politicians, by the more than three-fourths of a million dollars that the GEO Group spent lobbying the state legislature in the last election cycle.

Thankfully, one of Alexander’s fellow Republicans, Mike Fasano, is able to easily identify the root of the deficiencies of private prisons, and has been challenging this plan from the get-go.
“Talk about a dangerous situation for the public! Because, in my opinion, privatizing our prisons, you bring a private company in, all they care about is the bottom line. That’s why they’re a company. That’s why they trade on the New York Stock Exchange, that’s why they trade on any exchange for that matter, they have stockholders, they have board members to be answerable to; therefore, they have to make a profit and by doing that, in my opinion, you put people at risk.”
(The article cited here goes into a lot more detail on the lack of oversight and transparency of the industry, which in turn results in a breakdown of accountability)

In addition to Mr. Fasano’s agitation within the legislature, the Florida Police Benevolent Association, the union for COs in the state, has also come to the rescue of Florida’s prisoners by filing a lawsuit seeking to prevent the privatization push. The lawsuit contends that the process by which the plan was passed actually violates the state constitution, part of which is designed to keep budgetary and policy decisions separate. By utilizing the budget as the sole forum for discussing the plan, legislative leaders avoided a public debate that could have proven disastrous to the interests of privateers. The legislature also pulled a nifty trick by tying the plan to the entire corrections budget, making it virtually veto-proof.
Really!!!
6:50AM MAR 11TH 2014
And, Tom Feeney, President & CEO of the Associated Industries of Florida said, “I am thankful that Governor Scott works hard every day to make Florida a business-friendly state. We look forward to working with Governor Scott and the Florida Legislature to make our state the best place in the nation to do business.”

Guess this means Jebbie and Tommie are going to use those little Clint Curtis "puter" vote like we want you too chips to re-elect their man Ricky "poo" Scott -

After graduating, Scott practiced law at Johnson & Swanson in Dallas, Texas, where he was eventually made partner. In 1988, Scott and multimillionaire Richard Rainwater founded their own company, Columbia Hospital Corporation, through which they bought old hospitals, including "many in South Florida." The venture was so successful that Business Week named it one of the best performing companies in the nation. A 1997 fraud investigation forced Scott out as CEO and Chairman. From then on until his venture into politics, Scott dabbled in several profitable investment schemes, and was even co-owner of the Texas Rangers baseball team with President George W. Bush. REALLY!!!

Why that ole donut making lying booger!! These criminals are just one big happy family stealing the American blind!!!!

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